CONFERENCE PROGRAM

Saturday,
 9 June 2018
Sunday,
 10 June 2018
Monday,
 11 June 2018
Tuesday,
 12 June 2018
Wednesday,
 13 June 2018
Workshops and Doctoral Consortium
Opening keynote
Parallel sessions
Parallel sessions
Parallel sessions
Parallel sessions
Parallel sessions
Lunch
Lunch
Lunch
Parallel sessions
Parallel sessions
Parallel sessions
Closing panel
Welcoming reception
Demos
Provocations&WIP
Design exhibition
Conference Dinner
Saturday, 9 June 2018

Workshops
Sunday, 10 June 2018

Workshops and Doctoral Consortium
Welcoming reception
Monday, 11 June 2018

Opening keynote
Parallel sessions
Lunch
Parallel sessions
Demos
Provocations&WIP
Design exhibition
Tuesday, 12 June 2018

Parallel sessions
Parallel sessions
Lunch
Parallel sessions
Conference Dinner
Wednesday, 13 June 2018

Parallel sessions
Parallel sessions
Lunch
Parallel sessions
Closing panel

Add-on extra program (separate fee): Thursday 14 June 2018
Cultural an industry visit to Shenzhen, China.

Updates after author notifications, 5 March 2018.

OPENING KEYNOTE

Erik Stolterman: To Study Interaction and Interfaces: An Approach and Some Findings

It is hard to deny an often-heard claim that our artifacts and environments are becoming more and more complex, more and more “alive,” and as a consequence more and more demanding. We have to interact more. There seems to be no retreat or escape from interactivity. Some well-informed critics worry that the proliferation of interactions and interactive things has already gone too far. Their concerns raise many questions. Does interactivity in fact increase? How can we know? What does it really mean to claim that it does? And if indeed it is increasing, what does it mean? And why is this happening? And should something be done? Despite this development there seems to be no precise idea of what interaction is and what being interactive means, beyond a vague notion that it is some kind of interplay, usually optimistically understood as good-natured cooperation. 

Yet, there seems to be no precise idea of what interaction is and what being interactive means. Instead, as designers, we are guided by our vague assumptions about it, sometimes universalizing our beliefs about interactivity, sometimes being too sensitive to human diversity. 

In this talk I will present the analytical and philosophical work I have done for many years, together with my colleague Lars-Erik Janlert. We have examined properties and qualities of designed artifacts and systems; primarily those properties that are open for manipulation to designers, that is, properties that designers can and do intentionally affect by their design decisions (and thus in principle are possible to control). Rather than taking users and their subjective experiences of the artifacts and systems as the primary target for examination, unfashionable as it may be, we have chosen to be objective in the sense of focusing on the artifacts and systems. Apart from discussing our approach, I will briefly introduce some of our main results consisting of some developed definitions of existing (and some new) concepts, such as, interactivity, interactability, interactiveness. I will end with some comments on what this kind of investigation can tell us about the future by introducing the notions of faceless interaction, interactivity clutter, and interactivity fields.

Bio: Erik Stolterman

Erik Stolterman is Professor in Informatics and the Senior Executive Associate Dean of the School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering at Indiana University, Bloomington. He is also professor at the Institute of Design at Umeå University, Sweden. Stolterman is co-Editor for the Design Thinking/Design Theory book series by MIT Press, and on several editorial boards for international journals (The HCI journal, International Journal of Design, Design Studies, Design, Economics and Innovation, International Journal of Designs for Learning, Studies in Material Thinking, Human Computation, Artifact). Stolterman’s main work is within the areas of HCI, interfaces, interactivity, interaction design, design practice, philosophy and theory of design. Stolterman has published a large number of articles and five books, including “Thoughtful Interaction Design” (MIT Press) and “The Design Way” (MIT Press) and the recently published “Things That Keep Us Busy--The Elements of Interaction” (MIT Press, 2017).

CLOSING KEYNOTES

Jodi Forlizzi, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

This is an interesting era for design in terms of the diverse ways that designers need to work. The advent of cloud computing and the sensors in the mobile phones we carry means that there is a vast amount of data collected about what people do. There is a vast opportunity for designers to leverage this data to create products, services and systems that are tailored to individual needs. At the same time, designers at Google are designing products and services that millions of people use every day. All this sets up an interesting dichotomy for today’s designers, who need to take into account both personal and adaptive and global and scaled in how they think, design, and take action.

Bio: Jodi Forlizzi

Jodi Forlizzi is a the Geschke Director and a Professor of Human-Computer Interaction in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University and a Co-founder of Pratter.us, a healthcare startup. Her current research interests include designing educational games that are engaging and effective, designing robots, AVs, and other technology services that adapt to people’s needs, and designing for healthcare. Jodi is a member of the ACM CHI Academy and has been honored by the Walter Reed Army Medical Center for excellence in HRI design research. Jodi has consulted with Disney and General Motors to create innovative product-service systems.

Kun-pyo Lee, KAIST, South Korea

What are the diversifying factors of design research in academia and practice, and how can they be interconnected while maintaining the advantages of being diverse? 

Design research has a relatively short history compared to other well established academic disciplines. Therefore, the relationship between design academia and design practice tend to be disconnected. This disconnection becomes more serious with the rapid introduction of new technologies such as AI keep challenging the validity of the existing bodies of design knowledge, methods, and processes. 

Faced with these new big changes, a healthy cycle of coexistence of academia and practice is required more than ever and a mutual synergetic collaboration between academia and practice is inevitable. Practical designers regard research as something done in the pre-stage of the design concept development, whereas the academia perceives research as an instrument for knowledge generation. 

Design research in practice and academia differ significantly in respect to goal, deliverables, applicability, methods, scope, venue, among other things, but is this good for design?

Bio: Kun-pyo Lee

Kun-pyo LEE is Professor at the Department of Industrial Design, KAIST, South Korea and the director of the Human-Centered Interaction Design Lab for more than 30 years. He is co-founder and president emeritus of IASDR (International Association of Societies of Design Research). He also served as Chief Design Officer (Executive Vice President) of Corporate Design Center, LG Electronics. He is well known in Asia as an early pioneer in the field of design research, UX design and user-centered design, for which he was recognized as Honorary Fellow of the Design Research Society, and Local Hero at CHI 2015. After returning back to KAIST from LG with unique experiences in industry and academia he has been focusing on establishing a new design education paradigm under the name of Design 3.0 – Big, Deep and Open.

Phoebe Sengers, Cornell University, USA

The act of designing technologies does not simply create functionality; it also offers possibilities for action, ways of looking at the world, and modes through which we can relate to one another. How we design technologies reflects what we value; who we think is important, and in what ways; which places, people and possibilities are in our imaginations, and which are not. 

Current ways of designing technologies frequently narrow these possibilities, in two ways. The first is that technology design is dominated by a narrow demographic: predominantly white and Asian, white collar, highly educated, urban. These designers’ ways of imagining new technological worlds are shaped by the worlds they themselves know and value, which are only a small slice of global ways of being. The second is that even as technology design is being increasingly engaged in around the world by and for people outside this demographic, local adaptations are frequently judged and limited by what makes sense from the perspective of Silicon Valley and other urban high-tech centers. 

Supporting the rich diversity of human experience requires explicitly identifying and appreciating values and experiences outside of mainstream technology design logics.

Bio: Phoebe Sengers

Phoebe Sengers is an Associate Professor at Cornell in Information Science and Science & Technology Studies, where she leads the Culturally Embedded Computing group. Her work integrates ethnographic and historical analysis of the social implications of technology with design methods to suggest alternative future possibilities. Her group explores rural, working-class and global South experiences of technologies, traces the emerging entanglements between people and data, and uses design to speculate about alternative pasts and futures. Sengers led the Cornell campus of the Intel Science & Technology Center for Social Computing, has been a Fulbright Fellow, a Fellow in the Cornell Society for the Humanities, and a Public Voices Fellow, and received an NSF CAREER award. She holds an interdisciplinary PhD in Artificial Intelligence and Cultural Theory from Carnegie Mellon University.

ONE-DAY WORKSHOPS ON 

SATURDAY JUNE 9TH

From Artifacts to Architecture 

Hamed Alavi, Elizabeth Churchill, David Kirk, Henriette Bier, Himanshu Verma, Denis Lalanne, and Holger Schnädelbach 

The vision and mission of research under the banner of Ubiquitous Computing has increasingly moved from focusing on the realm of "artifacts" to the realm of "environments". We seek to scrutinize this very transition, and raise questions that relate to the specific attributes of built environments that set them inherently apart from artifacts. How does an interactive environment differ from an interactive artifact, a collection of artifacts, or an integrated suite of artifacts? Consequently, we ask what are the new user experience dimensions that HCI researchers should merge into their considerations, for example, by supplementing usability and engagement with occupants' comfort across multiple dimensions, and shifting attention from (often) short lifespan and discretionary to durable and immersive experiences? In this contribution, we bring arguments from the literature of environmental psychology and architecture that highlight the points of divergence between artifacts and architecture, and then translate them into challenges for Human-Computer Interaction, and particularly for the emerging domain of Human-Building Interaction.

For more information please see  human-ist.unifr.ch/A2A
or contact Himanshu Verma <a2a-dis18@unifr.ch >

Designing for Everyday Care in Communities

Austin Toombs, Andy Dow, John Vines, Colin Gray, Barbara Dennis, Rachel Clarke, and Ann Light 

Recent HCI scholarship has begun to incorporate the concept of care as an alternative design lens, moving beyond health care or social care to consider care as a fundamental relational quality of life. This one-day workshop brings together researchers to find a shared understanding of the ways in which interpersonal care and interdependence could be supported through technology design in community contexts. The goal is to raise issues and increase sensitivity towards care, with the ultimate aim of impacting design practices—including how one might design community interactions with and for care. Participants will learn together how such a focus could impact their own research, while mapping and articulating how research and design in HCI-related fields can and does integrate care into sociotechnical systems more broadly.

For more information please see hcdd.purdue.edu/everydaycareincommunities

or contact Austin Toombs <toombsa@purdue.edu>

Manipulating Reality? Designing and Deploying Virtual Reality in Sensitive Settings

Jenny Waycott, Greg Wadley, Steven Baker, Hasan Ferdous, Thuong Hoang, Kathrin Gerling, Christopher Headleand, and Adalberto Simeone  

Virtual reality (VR) is now being designed and deployed in diverse sensitive settings, especially for therapeutic purposes. For example, VR experiences are used for diversional therapy in aged care and as therapy for people living with conditions such as phobias and post-traumatic stress. While these uses of VR offer great promise, they also present significant challenges. Given the novelty of VR, its immersive nature, and its impact on the user’s sense of reality, it can be particularly challenging to engage participants in co-design and predict what might go wrong when implementing these technologies in sensitive settings. This workshop provides a forum for researchers working in this emerging space to share stories about their experiences of designing and evaluating VR applications in settings such as aged care or mental health therapy. The workshop will develop a manifesto for good practice, outlining co-design strategies and ethical issues to consider when designing and deploying VR in sensitive settings.

For more information please see  sensitivevr.org    
or contact Jenny Waycott <jwaycott@unimelb.edu.au >

Design and Dislocation: Material Tactics for (Re)connection

Verena Fuchsberger, Martin Murer, Manfred Tscheligi, Dorthé Smit, Laura Devendorf, Bieke Zaman, and Marije Nouwen

This workshop focuses on the material qualities of dislocation between people, things, places, and data. The process of becoming separated from humans or things is likely to have diverse consequences; from shifting frequency, modes, or routines of interaction and communication, to alternate meanings of connectedness. In this workshop, we aim to discuss a broad range of material manifestations and implications of (designing for) dislocation. While engaging with material qualities of dislocation, we will explore how design can create opportunities for (re)connection in response to dislocation.

For more information please see hci.sbg.ac.at/dislocation-dis2018  

or contact Verena Fuchsberger <verena.fuchsberger@sbg.ac.at>

The 'Next Billion Users': Designing for Emerging Markets

Chandrika Cycil, Rajiv Arjan, and Lauren Celenza

The number of users coming online for the first time on mobile phones in emerging markets is fast growing. As the trajectory of internet use for these users follows a mobile-first experience, technical and infrastructural constraints impact the overall experience. The workshop aims to identify and discuss salient themes surrounding the technology needs of users in emerging markets that include Asia, Africa and South America. Emphasis will be on how researchers and designers understand these unique needs and the new insights and perspectives needed to design for mobile users in emerging markets.

For information please see sites.google.com/view/dis-nbu-workshop-2018

or contact Chandrika Cycil <chandrika.cycil@gmail.com>

ONE-DAY WORKSHOPS ON 

SUNDAY JUNE 10TH

Time, Temporality, and Slowness: Future Directions for Design Research

William Odom,  Sian Lindley, Larissa Pschetz, Vasiliki Tsaknaki, Anna Vallgårda, and Mikael Wiberg

A diverse set of research and design initiatives related to time, temporality, and slowness has emerged in the DIS and HCI communities. The goals of this workshop are to: 1. bring together researchers to reflect on conceptual, methodological, and practice-based outcomes and issues and 2. to develop an agenda for future research in this growing area. 

For more information see https://willodom.com/time_temporality_slowness/ contact William Odom <wodom@sfu.ca >For more information see https://willodom.com/time_temporality_slowness/

Let’s Get Divorced: Constructing Knowledge Outcomes for Critical Design and Constructive Design Research

Forlizzi, Zimmerman, Hekkert, Koskinen

Over the last two decades, constructive design research (CDR) — more commonly called Research through Design within HCI — has become an accepted mode of scholarly inquiry within the design research community. It has been described as having three distinct genres: lab, field, and showroom. The lab and field genres typically take a pragmatic stance and typically propose a preferred future. Research done following the showroom approach — more commonly known as critical design (CD), speculative design, or design fictions — typically offers a polemic and a critique of the current state embodied in an artifact. Recently, we have observed a growing conflict within the design research community between pragmatic and critical design researchers [4]. To help reduce this conflict, we called for a divorce between CD and pragmatic CDR, advocating that each approach has its own merits and should be evaluated on its own account. Other design researchers have pushed back on this stance, seeking to create some middle ground to connect these two types of research. In this day-long workshop, we seek to look at exemplar CDR and CD case studies, to develop methods for describing, evaluating, replicating, and making use of knowledge outcomes from these two forms of design research.

For more inquiries about participation please contact Jodi Forlizzi <forlizzi@cs.cmu.edu>

Designing Interactive Systems to Support and Augment Creativity: A Roadmap for Research and Design

Dalsgaard, Halskov, Frich, Biskjaer, Kerne, Lupfer

The aims of the workshop are to examine and discuss the current state of research in designing interactive systems to support and augment creative work, and to outline a roadmap for future research initiatives. The workshop will explore methodological issues and approaches, overarching trends and developments, exemplary cases, and future initiatives to study and design systems and tools to augment creative practices. Participation in the workshop requires participants to contribute with a position paper on one of the above topics, and to read and comment on co-participants contributions before the workshop.

For more inquiries about participation contact Peter Dalsgaard <dalsgaard@cavi.au.dk>

Designing for Effective Interactions with Data in the Internet of Things

Wolff, Seffah, Kortuem, van der Linden

The Internet of Things (IoT), a type of cyber-physical system, has led to a drastic growth in the number of devices and sensors connected to each other and to the digital word. This has further led to an exponential increase in the amount of data being produced and disseminated throughout such systems. This data has the potential to provide valuable insights into user behavior that can inform a design process. It also comprises an important aspect of an IoT product or service that an end user might interact to gain actionable insights. For example, when to use energy in the home, how to avoid polluted or flooded areas, or to visit the shops at quiet times. These same users may also be one source of the data that is analysed to provide this intelligence. However, in many case more intelligence is gained by combining different data sets.This raises questions about how to help both designers and end-users to get the most value from the insights acquired through the combination and analysis of IoT data, whilst being sensitive to issues around privacy and security of data contributed by the public. There is currently no clear framework to support designers in navigating through a design process that uses and combines such complex data.The aim of this one day workshop is to explore how to effectively incorporate data into a design process and how to design for more effective interactions between humans and data within IoT technologies. It will also create a roadmap for development of new methods and tools to support responsible, data-driven, co-design of new IoT interactive products and services.

For more inquiries about participation see the website http://hci-cps.lut.fi/index.php/hci-dis2018/ or contact Annika Wolff <annika.wolff@lut.fi>

Handmaking Food Ideals: Crafting the Design of Future Food-related Technologies

Vannucci, Bertran, Marshall, Wilde

Much technology is designed to help people enact processes faster and more precisely. Yet, these advantages can come at the cost of other, perhaps less tangible, values. In this workshop we aim to articulate values associated with handmade through a co-creative exploration in the food domain. Our objective is to explore the potential of integrating such values into future food-related technologies. In a full day workshop we will: critically reflect on the notion of handmade; engage actively with food—production, plating and consumption—as design material; and conduct collective discussions around the values that these processes and materials can embody when attended to through lenses other than efficiency. By handmaking: touching, smelling, tasting, listening, speaking and enacting choreographies with the materials at hand, we hope to deepen the discussion of the meaning associated with the handmade and bring a richness to ways that designers imagine future food-related technologies.

For more information see  handmakingfood.wordpress.com/or contact Erica Vannucci <erica.vannucci@northumbria.ac.uk>

Command and Contaminate? Designing Games with Remote-Controlled Micro-Organisms

Kim, van Dierendonck, Poslad

In recent years, video games that integrate real biological entities such as micro-organisms have been becoming increasingly popular. Yet the notion of connecting such games through the Internet, whereby players can remotely control microbes and observe their behaviours in real-time online, is relatively uncommon. In this two-part, hands-on workshop, we explore this gap through gaming and speculative design. We ask questions regarding the present and the future of connected microbial gaming: How are microbes currently connected online, and what are the future possibilities?

For more inquiries about participation see the website biohackanddesign.com/dis2018 or contact Raphael Kim <r.s.kim@qmul.ac.uk>

TWO-DAY WORKSHOP ON SATURDAY JUNE 9TH & SUNDAY JUNE 10TH

Designing within Connected Systems

Funk, Hengeveld

In this two-day workshop, we investigate how to design in the context of distributed, networked interfaces, dynamic input-output mappings and emergent aesthetics. With this workshop, we aim to complement the theoretical discussion of positions provided by the participants with the hands-on activity of designing and building a networked group interface for music manipulation using Leap Motion® controllers. Participants engage in a two-stage design process, the first focused on designing individual music controllers and the second on using these in a networked format. We conclude the workshop with a reflection and discussion of what was achieved at both theoretical and experiential levels, and project a roadmap of future activities together.

For more inquiries about participation contact Bart Hengeveld <b.j.hengeveld@tue.nl>

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